My Journey Continues

5D6B4195-blur

My decision to go into healthcare architecture was fairly simple. My previous experience interning at Array has shown me how rewarding working in the healthcare industry could be.  The healthcare industry is one that is continuously changing and adapting with new technology, allowing designers to adapt and transform with the changing trends. In a field with increasing rules and regulations that ensure the safety of patients and caregivers, the opportunity to design through details becomes necessary. As a healthcare architect, every decision throughout the design process directly impacts the well-being and comfort of both patient and caregiver.

“So, what do you do?”
It is a question that continuously comes up in conversation, yet is impossible to give a short answer to, trying to explain to people that I am an “Architectural Designer” in the process of becoming an “Architect.” Five years in architecture school is just the beginning of my journey to becoming an “Architect.” My time in college allowed me to get a solid foundation on the theories, technologies and continued advancement of the architecture profession.

5600 hours.
That is the number of hours of experience in the architectural field required before one can become a licensed architect. The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB for short) is one of the governing bodies of the architecture profession that developed standards for the licensure of architects. As part of the three-step process of becoming an architect (education, experience & examination), NCARB created a comprehensive program known as the Intern Development Program (IDP) to ensure interns in the field of architecture have the necessary skills and knowledge required to practice.

WHITE-R_120418_N131_large

Last but not least, examination.
The final step towards licensure is an arduous seven-part exam that tests interns on their knowledge and skills needed to provide architectural services while protecting the health and safety of the public. All seven parts of the test take 33.5 hours. Not including the hours, days and months studying for them.
While I am ecstatic that I survived architecture school and many late nights in studio, I have many more stops ahead, all exhilarating yet terrifying.

SHARE OUR KNOWLEDGE
Email to someoneShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest
Topics: , .